Patient safety must come first!

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Book Reviews

Quote from book review on "What Killed My Dad?" by Publichouse.sg’s Hermione Poh (February 2012):

"What struck me most in her book was that despite all the measures in place in our large hospitals, incidences where patient safety are compromised occur, and often on a daily basis. At work, we go through training on proper hand-washing, are instructed on exactly how and when we should put on our gowns, gloves and masks right down to the smallest detail; bed management units are given protocols on where best to place infectious patients; we are constantly reminded by signs in the hospital about proper hand hygiene; projects with the aim of reducing hospital acquired infections are awarded grants and are carried out. In spite of the multitude of efforts – patients still catch nosocomial infections. Does this mean our practices are wrong? Or are we still not doing enough?"

To read the entire write-up, please click here.

                            - Ms Hermione Poh


Quote from book review on "Are Hospitals Safe?" published in NTUC Lifestyle November 2009:

"I highly recommend this book because it is best to know what to expect if stricken with a serious illness. It is not something we want to think about when we are well, but sickness is a reality we should be prepared for. The author shares what she has learnt the hard way--flaws in the medical system and the frustration of dealing with all too-human medical professionals. From dangerous bugs waiting to pounce on the already sick to filtering out the 'wrong' doctors, Soh Hong provides insight that can be a comforting anchor-hold to those who feel helpless in the alien environment of hospitals."

                            - Ms Tan Shee Lah
                            Managing Editor, Lifestyle



Quote from book review on "What Killed My Dad?" published in SMA News March 2009:

"Singapore's public healthcare system is indeed one of the best in the world, especially if one considers the amount of financing it runs on. But it is neither above improvement nor criticism. This book is unique in that it is the first that has provided a frank, structured, albeit personal critique of our hospital system. All local patients and healthcare staff, especially medical and nursing students, should read it."

To read the entire write-up, please click here.

                            - Dr Hsu Li Yang


Blurb on "What Killed My Dad?" published in January 2009:

"I empathise with Ms Lee Soh Hong's loss of her father. Objectively, it was a combination of factors: human factors, system factors and disease factors. These factors may be beyond the individual provider's control. Nevertheless, I read from her book three messages for all healthcare providers and hospital administrators in Singapore and indeed, worldwide to take note and put on their dashboards for continuing attention. These are:

(1) Hospitals must spend resources and enforcements to control deadly hospital caught infections. Patients are dying because of superbugs.

(2) The hospital system of care of multiple doctors for very sick patients cannot result in optimal care. Some reforms appear necessary.

(3) Communication of news of great impact to patients needs to be more sensitive.

And all these flowed from the experience of her father's last illness."

                            - A/Prof Goh Lee Gan
                            Head, Division of Family Medicine, National University Health System
                            Associate Professor, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore



Updated on 22 October 2012



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